Friday, January 4, 2008

A Hero Who Should Not Be Forgotten

Do you know who this woman is? Please click here if you don't. Black women struggle everyday to be heard, but there are some women of color whose voices are completely overlooked or ignored. When times get hard for you, try to remember that somewhere in Iraq there are many women of color serving far from home, far from their families and their children. Every semester I use this heroic woman as an example of how we value certain lives in America. As women of color, its our job to remember. Inspired by a post done by Tami on her blog, What Tami Said.

9 comments:

Tami January 4, 2008 at 7:26 AM  

Thanks for the shout out, Tracey.

And let's also not forget Shoshana Johnson, who was also eclipsed by the frenzy surrounding Jessica Lynch:

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/10/24/1066974315046.html?from=storyrhs

Professor Tracey January 4, 2008 at 7:47 AM  

Thanks Tami! I didn't forget. When I ask my students about these women, everyone remember Jessica Lynch, some folks remember Shoshana because of her name or she is the "black girl", but rarely does anyone remember Lisa by name, she is always the "one that died." Shameful!

Symphony January 4, 2008 at 7:50 AM  

And those same women must deal with sexual harassment and assault as if they don't have enough to worry about.

On Essential Presence I did a post about Blacks in the military and there is a link about sexual assaults and rapes against women in the military. Scary.

And I'm still angered at the treatment and lack of concern from the public regarding Shoshana Johnson. She is America's first black female prisoner of war. Now, this isn't an honor anyone would want but she deserved everything Jessica Lynch received.

Lynch got the headlines, the TV movie, the prime-time TV interviews, and a biography by a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer.

West Virginia gave Lynch a full scholarship. Did Texas do anything for Shoshana?

Originally Shoshana was only to get 30% disability because her injuries wouldnt completely hamper her ability to earn a living. She was a cook. She was shot in her ankles; cooks dont sit. And the Army suggested she be discharged. Why the discharge?

Yes, Lynch had broken bones but that doesn't preclude her from sitting on her butt and making a living like they expected Shoshana to do. Lynch got 80%.

Shoshana appeal the decision. I'm not sure how her appeal went.

Randi523 January 4, 2008 at 2:07 PM  

I always think about mothers away from their children in Iraq, esp. with the past holiday season. Yes, it's sad that fathers are away from their children also, but I know it's 50 million times more difficult for a mother. God Bless them all.

tasha212 January 4, 2008 at 6:43 PM  

I notice that as with everything else, white soldiers receive more coverage than black soldiers, esp. females. I couldn't imagine what it must feel like to have to leave your children behind and know that there is a possibility that you might not come back.

CW January 4, 2008 at 6:49 PM  

Great Post! Soldiers of color should get more publicity than they do now...Thanx~!


BWDB http://thecwexperience.wordpress.com

Professor Tracey January 4, 2008 at 7:29 PM  

Symphony,

I saw Shoshana speak a few years back and I was so disappointed. She did not seem very prepared to talk about her experience and not very truthful about her feelings about what Lynch got and she didn't. I thought it was very strange. She deserved a lot more than what she got!

La ~ msviswan January 4, 2008 at 7:32 PM  

Hi, I'm visiting your blog for the first! I will visit often. Well I also posted this link on Tami's blog and I want to share with your readers too. In 2006 I created a tribute for these black women of color fallen soldiers. Some people don't realize how many black women are also fighting this war and how many have paid their lives.

www.tributetoblackwomen.com/patriot_tribute.htm

La ~ msviswan January 4, 2008 at 7:37 PM  

"She did not seem very prepared to talk about her experience and not very truthful about her feelings about what Lynch got and she didn't. I thought it was very strange."

I feel that way too. My younger brother just "bitterly" came out the airforce after about 9 years. It seems they have black service people oddly programmed this way. There is a lot going on we don't know. Sorry to say.

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